CityCyclingEdinburgh Forum » Computers, GPS, 'Smart' 'Phones

Rosetta

(49 posts)
  • Started 7 years ago by Darkerside
  • Latest reply from Stickman

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  1. Darkerside
    Member

    I hope the people who run our work IT systems understand that our ancient version of IE is making it very hard for me to follow streams of the Rosetta landing progress.

    Best bet seems to be the Guardian text feed.

    PS: I realise the correct answer is "try working at work"

    Posted 7 years ago #
  2. chdot
    Admin

    You'll be able to get some work done this morning.

    "

    4m ago08:59
    The OSIRIS camera on Rosetta will take images of Philae during its descent. These are expected to arrive on Earth between 13:00GMT-14:00GMT.

    "

    Posted 7 years ago #
  3. chdot
    Admin

    Oh it's fine you can work all afternoon, landed early -

    Posted 7 years ago #
  4. Darkerside
    Member

    Images of the descent are all well and good, but there's still exciting stuff happening now!

    Seperation of Rosetta and Philae occured at 0835 (although we didn't get the signal confirming seperation until 0903).

    She's off!

    Posted 7 years ago #
  5. Roibeard
    Member

    Try XKCD for your fix...

    There is a cheated version for those without patience!

    Robert

    Posted 7 years ago #
  6. Darkerside
    Member

    Quick summary of what's going on:

    Rosetta is a European Space Agency probe launched in March 2004 to investigate comets; specifically comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko. This is interesting because we don't really know much about comets, despite theories that they might have seeded our world with building blocks for life.

    Rosetta carries a tiny lander called Philae. That has just been lobbed off the probe, and is travelling along a seven-hour ballistic trajectory to land on the surface of the comet. It has no propulsion, so is relying on some really good maths to ensure it ends up on the right spot, the right way up, and at slow enough speeds that it doesn't smash into the surface or bounce off.

    As it kisses the surface, screws in its three feet with drive into the surface. Combined with some harpoons, it's hoped that will be enough to keep it secure. Noone really knows what the surface is going to be like though.

    If everything goes well, [even more] Science will then happen.

    Sometimes, humans get things right.

    Posted 7 years ago #
  7. Darkerside
    Member

    Javascript's disabled, so the cheated xkcd version won't load. I'll have to step through it at home...

    Posted 7 years ago #
  8. cb
    Member

    "Science will then happen"

    The science up until this point has been pretty impressive to be honest.

    Posted 7 years ago #
  9. Darkerside
    Member

    Corrected :p

    Posted 7 years ago #
  10. I were right about that saddle
    Member

    @cb

    It's engineering up until it lands! Then the science begins.

    The engineering behind this is mind boggling, no matter how the afternoon pans out.

    I've been following the 'composition of comets' debate since the mid seventies, starting with reading my dad's New Scientist in the bathroom. This could be quite a day for that old astrochestnut.

    Posted 7 years ago #
  11. chdot
    Admin

    "The engineering behind this is mind boggling"

    I'm sure it is, but what is 'special'/new (apart from the challenge of landing on a small moving object), from other 'go somewhere far away and try a soft landing' trips?

    Posted 7 years ago #
  12. fimm
    Member

    If they can get the lander down, then they can start finding out what this comet is made of. Which is interesting because it is interesting because it is interesting.

    Posted 7 years ago #
  13. I were right about that saddle
    Member

    @chdot

    I suppose it's incrementaly different from previous missions. I'd think the hardest part is probably the feeble gravity available for the landing.

    I'm just amazed that these machines work at all after eight years in freezing irradiated hard vacuum.

    Posted 7 years ago #
  14. Darkerside
    Member

    The comet is really small, really far away, moving really fast, and digging in to it might reveal where life came from.

    (That's a bit of a Daily Mail summary, but still valid!)

    Posted 7 years ago #
  15. crowriver
    Member

    Aye, but What About The Workers?

    Posted 7 years ago #
  16. LivM
    Member

    "Wednesday's effort is also having to rely on some relatively old technologies.

    "Rosetta was despatched from Earth to catch 67P in 2004. That means it and Philae were designed and built in the 1990s.

    "And given the conservatism of space engineering, a number of its onboard systems will therefore undoubtedly be 1980s vintage."

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-30012854

    Posted 7 years ago #
  17. Stickman
    Member

    The company my brother works for does a lot of work for ESA. I know it was involved in some of the modelling for Beagle as well.

    I'll ask him if they had anything to do with this.

    Posted 7 years ago #
  18. Roibeard
    Member

    @LivD a number of its onboard systems will therefore undoubtedly be 1980s vintage.

    Earlier than even that...

    The thrusters used in Rosetta first saw service in 1974, so were designed well before that!

    Robert
    (Working next door to a space geek!)

    Posted 7 years ago #
  19. Roibeard
    Member

    Incidentally the thrusters were also used in Skynet, a British military satellite installation, presumably ironically named by techies and approved by generals who didn't go to the cinema...

    Robert

    Posted 7 years ago #
  20. I were right about that saddle
    Member

  21. Darkerside
    Member

    Touchdown!

    Said in the excited voice of an American football commentator.

    Posted 7 years ago #
  22. I were right about that saddle
    Member

    The 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko Independence Party will object to foreign probes coming here taking our sooty space slush.

    Posted 7 years ago #
  23. chdot
    Admin

    "

    1h ago19:58 Philae may have landed not once but twice – that’s the final message from Esa this evening.

    "

    http://www.theguardian.com/science/across-the-universe/live/2014/nov/12/rosetta-comet-landing-live-blog#block-5463bbdfe4b0f33efafdaa9f

    Posted 7 years ago #
  24. chdot
    Admin

    "

    Nathan Allen (@Sparkly77)
    12/11/2014 17:18
    Unexpected TV pictures coming in live,from #cometlanding

    http://pic.twitter.com/TXTNRPEdQG

    "

    Posted 7 years ago #
  25. Darkerside
    Member

    A not-overly-well-written dump of thoughts on the matter:

    http://www.darkerside.org/2014/11/rosetta-philae-comet-67p-2/

    Posted 7 years ago #
  26. Snowy
    Member

    The fact the mission was approved 21 years ago, back in November 1993, gives a very specific gravitas to the phrase "a lifetime's work".
    Chapeau, ESA!

    Posted 7 years ago #
  27. chdot
    Admin

    "

    JRehling (@JRehling)
    12/11/2014 17:01
    Fox: "Why did America waste money landing on a comet?"
    Scientist: "This is a European mission."
    Fox: "Why didn't America get there first?"

    "

    Posted 7 years ago #
  28. Darkerside
    Member

    BBC have an online video of an open university scientist completely, wildly, and exuberantly losing it with the news of a successful launch.

    I envy anyone who can be that inspired by their career!

    In other news, Philae is stable on the surface, although may have bounced a few times on landing...

    Posted 7 years ago #
  29. Baldcyclist
    Member

    Must confess to not being in the least excited about this.

    Sure, what they find out from the comet might turn out to be interesting.

    But being able to land something on an object going at a pre-defined speed, on a pre-defined trajectory isn't that ground breaking. Just like landing a plane on an aircraft carrier, except further away and without air friction or waves to worry about.

    Posted 7 years ago #
  30. steveo
    Member

    Or any direct real time control...

    Posted 7 years ago #

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