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Lumos helmet

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  1. SRD
    Moderator

    Anyone else going in on the Lumos helmet kick starter?

    https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/819484536/lumos-a-next-generation-bicycle-helmet

    Posted 6 years ago #
  2. ARobComp
    Member

    were these guys not on Dragons Den a few years back with the same thing?

    They got knocked back because one of the co-creators was basically already a multimillionaire...

    Posted 6 years ago #
  3. Stickman
    Member

    @SRD

    I hadn't seen that before, but my initial reaction is that it isn't a good idea.

    Initially, I think drivers are more likely to be confused by the lights flashing.

    If it does take off and a reasonable proportion of cyclists wear it then the pressure falls on those who don't wear helmets or wear an ordinary helmet. In the event of an accident, it will just be another reason to blame the cyclist if they haven't got one of these helmets.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  4. Greenroofer
    Member

    I recently found that a chap I know was wearing one of those airbag-type inflatable helmets. It looked like a really big and heavy Buff, and would be great for keeping your neck warm in winter but would be a bit sweaty in summer. I didn't realise, but it too has a battery in, so he had to keep it charged.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  5. rust
    Member

    At the very least I would want it to be modular so that a damaged or old helmet doesn't require the entire thing to be replaced.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  6. SRD
    Moderator

    @stickman, I think confusing drivers is a great idea.....

    more seriously 'it might confuse drivers' is not an argument to put me off something...

    even more seriously, i don't wear my helmet anymore in daytime or summer, generally, but commuting in the rain and grey of edinburgh winter, i'd love one of these.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  7. "@stickman, I think confusing drivers is a great idea.....

    more seriously 'it might confuse drivers' is not an argument to put me off something..."

    And why did you hit the cyclist sir?

    Well I was really confused by things ahead.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  8. Stickman
    Member

    "The sheriff said that although the driver was drunk and speeding, the cyclist was not wearing a flashing helmet..."

    Posted 6 years ago #
  9. Cyclingmollie
    Member

    The developer's desire to "take control of my own safety" reminds me of a blog I read recently. I can't remember where it was but it was a strong repudiation of the transfer of cycling safety from the community onto the individual.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  10. gembo
    Member

    I have lights on m helmet already. They have their dollars with 28 days to go?

    Posted 6 years ago #
  11. Morningsider
    Member

    "Water resistant" - I think any experienced cyclist knows that's code for "Swiss cheese". A brake light that works by accelerometer is a daft idea, it's liable to come on every time you hit a hill.

    Most cyclists already have lights that can be seen for miles. I'm pretty sure drivers understand what left and right turn signals mean. Cycling in the dark isn't some terrifying experience in an urban area. Modern street lights are pretty good and modern car lights can light up huge areas. I've yet to hear of an unlit ninja cyclist being hit in Edinburgh - never mind cyclists using lights, so I can't see this offering any more "protection" than standard bike lights.

    Also - it looks pretty hideous.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  12. Arellcat
    Moderator

    I'm pretty sure drivers understand what left and right turn signals mean.

    Drivers appear to have great difficulty understanding the turn signals on the torpedo. It's not like they're not very bright. But it may be that the ones on the back are a bit close to the centreline, which the RVLR do specify, were it a four-wheeled torpedo.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  13. SRD
    Moderator

    @cyclingmollie - possibly a blogpost that I wrote on that topic which chdot posted a link to recently??!

    Sorry guys, I still think it's a cool idea :)

    Posted 6 years ago #
  14. I actually think the brake light, if it works properly, isn't a bad idea. And I'm not sure drivers will find it 'confusing' (my post above was really just about it being a 'good idea' to confuse drivers...).

    Not sure on the indicators though - really not sure if the majority of drivers will really 'get' what's happening there, and from a distance they may be too close together (Arellcat alluded to distance between indicators above, and there's some rule for motorbikes, which is why indicators on the rear are on little sticks - basically if indicators are too close together, then from a distance it's difficult, nigh on impossible, to tell with direction is flashing).

    Basically if you want a helmet to wear, and you like the lights and fandangles, then no reason why not. I'll stick to lights on the bike itself (and the dynamo lighting on the Kaff is my 'don't ever forget your lights' solution, as the helmet still has the 'I've got my lights, oh, damn, I haven't charged them' potential).

    Also, some of the rhetoric in the explanations is plain stooooopid.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  15. Arellcat
    Moderator

    A brake light that works by accelerometer is a daft idea, it's liable to come on every time you hit a hill.

    I think that a brake light worked by accelerometer and mounted on the head is a daft idea. The head surely moves too much - though perhaps only really in rotation, rather than fore-aft, so my criticism may be misplaced.

    But B&M already makes a rear light with an accelerometer brake light, and it works surprisingly well (Kim on yACF has one on her bike, and I watched her light as we rode to the York velodrome).

    The problem is that the helmet is likely to remain niche for the foreseeable future of helmets, and drivers do not expect brake lights and indicators on bicycles. I think the further problem is that a brake light is useful when the closing speed between a vehicle at 'typical' speed and a vehicle that's braking is significant. Quite often, bicycles are effectively close to stationary compared with cars moving at 30 or 40mph, and any reaction brought about by a brake light is tempered by the recognition of 'a bicycle' and then the typical interpretation of width and speed and ignorability.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  16. Firedog
    Member

    Looks like a bicycle helmet designed by a car driver.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  17. neddie
    Member

    ...if the “sea of lights” in Regent’s Street genuinely makes it difficult for a driver to pick out anything (the police seem to take a witness’s opinion at face value rather than cite forensic evidence)...

    https://beyondthekerb.wordpress.com/2015/03/20/erasure/

    Posted 6 years ago #
  18. Eddie, that kinda proves the point. Obviously the article s correct in that this should not be the case, but at the moment it is, ergo adding to the sea of lights could, bizarrely, be seen as mitigation for a driver's irresponsibility. I don't think anyone upthread is saying that should be the case, or that it's morally correct in any way, but simply reflecting reality (as Bez's article does).

    Posted 6 years ago #
  19. Darkerside
    Member

    What Arellcat said (with the humble correction that the B&M braking function is driven by the frequency from the dynamo rather than an accelerometer, unless they've got two models).

    I think it looks neat. It's not something I'd use and the brakelights and indicators seem a little gimmicky, but integrated red/white lights in helmets are definitely good.

    If people are investing in R&D of cycling stuff, I struggle to see how it can do people who cycle any harm. Concerns about the law discriminating against non-flashing-head-people in the future seem a little alarmist. I'm reasonably confident that the average CCE-er spends more on their lighting than £5 at Tesco, yet I've never seen a court comment on the quality of a cyclist's lights.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  20. Luath
    Member

    Are there not regulations restricting the height lights can be off the ground? 1.5 metres rings a bell which would rule out helmet lights for most adults.
    I'm not keen on the idea that a flashing light next to other flashing lights on your helmet is a suitable indicator, especially when other road users are expecting hand signals from cyclists.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  21. Nah, there's a 'minimum' height (things like the ree-lights that mount down on the hub are borderline not compliant. But as far as I'm aware there's no maximum (see plenty vans and lorries with lights right at the top, both brake and indicators, and in some cases, decorative...)

    Posted 6 years ago #
  22. Luath
    Member

    This
    ctc

    and this
    legislation

    suggests a maximum height above the ground for lights of 1,500mm, although I could be miss-interpreting this!

    Posted 6 years ago #
  23. Cyclops
    Member

    You are required by law to have front and rear lights fixed to your bicycle, not you, so you'd still need these as well as any helmet lights.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  24. Morningsider
    Member

    Luath - those regulations only apply to lights fitted to a bike and not helmet mounted lights. Technically, the legislation requires a rear and front light to be fitted directly to a bike. Helmet mounted lights are perfectly "legal", but should be used in conjunction with bike mounted lights. However, I doubt anyone would ever get into trouble for using only helmet mounted lights.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  25. kaputnik
    Moderator

    I've often wondered how all but the most cycle-nerd of police officers with a lot of time on their hands to research serial numbers would be able to tell a pre-1985 bike from a 1986 model regards the pedal reflectors.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  26. Luath
    Member

    I agree you're unlikely to get into trouble for only using helmet lights but as it does seem to be illegal to only have helmet lights, the Lumos marketing is on thin ice:
    "Thanks to Lumos, as long as you have your helmet, you will always have your lights with you."

    Posted 6 years ago #
  27. wee folding bike
    Member

    I've got one of the B&M brake lights. It only works when the lights are on. I'm not sure how effective it is in daylight. You can't easily see it when you're on the bike and it only works when the wheel is decelerating…

    I did have two of them but the super cap broke loose on the bike with a luggage rack. Keeping my fingers crossed for the one that's still working. Broken super caps is a bane of the Brompton tail light. Even their own model suffers from it.

    Posted 6 years ago #
  28. I think Lumos is based in the States, so presumably over there will have different laws and standards. Though if you're marketing to the world you should have a little disclaimer along those lines.

    Cheers for the lights legislation - didn't know that, although would have to be a reasonably big bike!

    Posted 6 years ago #
  29. SRD
    Moderator

    So, despite all you naysayers, I should have one of these arriving soon. Haven't worn a helmet since the clocks went forward, but it's getting to be that time again...

    Posted 4 years ago #
  30. SRD
    Moderator

    Helmet arrived yesterday. Easy to set up. Also talks to my phone using bluetooth! which is silly, except it give me a battery %

    Wore it on a very short run today (normally wouldn't have, as it was a quiet ride on the canal in daylight, but kids wanted me to try it). Lots of comments and even more looks - just for the lights. Do't know how anyone reacted to the turn signals.

    The brake light is still in 'beta' mode and apparently draws down the charge a lot, so I suspect I won't be trialling it, but it is there is anyone wants to test it with a camera and whatnot.

    Posted 4 years ago #

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