CityCyclingEdinburgh Forum » Infrastructure

Ice

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  1. lionfish
    Member

    Cool, there might be one appearing on Slateford Road near the medical centre... then I can start gritting the pavement slope properly!

    Cycled the canal this morning - was crispy/not too slippery.

    canal-wildlife-update: Loved the skid patterns on the ice from landing ducks(?). The swans were in a tiny hole in the ice when I past them - only a couple of yards wide. Nearly took out a crow which decided at the last second to hop/fly infront of my bike (brakes worked and snowy-ice surprisingly grippy). All looked very Christmasy along the canal - glad I went that way :D

    Posted 8 years ago #
  2. chdot
    Admin

    "All looked very Christmasy along the canal - glad I went that way"

    Cycling gives you options...

    Posted 8 years ago #
  3. steveo
    Member

    Posted 8 years ago #
  4. lionfish
    Member

    Thanks steveo - I'd noticed the new swans too. I wonder if the ice etc drove them towards the 'warmth' of the city? Cool photo btw! (and look at all the different prints on the snow!).

    Posted 8 years ago #
  5. steveo
    Member

    I'm a little surprised the native pair put up with them tbh.

    There was a crow having a drink from one of the thinner bits of ice but took off when it seen me standing around. Busy bit of water! I'd have liked to watch a duck trying to land on the canal, that would have been quite funny in a mean sort of way.

    Posted 8 years ago #
  6. Ducks landing on ice are hilarious; as are Coots trying to walk over ice.

    Can't view the pic above, will check it out once home. You know the ice is thick when swans start being able to walk on it - got some photos from Duddingston Loch a couple of years ago when the ice was so thick they were contemplating curling on it!

    Posted 8 years ago #
  7. Min
    Member

    Curling swans would be a sight to behold right enough.

    Posted 8 years ago #
  8. Greenroofer
    Member

    Someone had tried out the ice on the canal near Hailes Quarry Park this evening. They'd tried and, judging by the trail of wet footprints on the towpath, they'd failed.

    People in that area are obviously testing the ice quite thoroughly. There's a range of rubbish bags, some traffic cones, a bollard and (new this evening) a push chair sitting on the ice. Last week I seem to recall a mattress too, but that's now disappeared.

    Posted 8 years ago #
  9. Darkerside
    Member

    Managed to ground the top of the rear wheel on the rack of the pannier when going over the anti-terrorist speedbumps in the base today. I didn't need all those tyre spikes anyway...

    Probably ought to add some more air to the rear shock :s

    Posted 8 years ago #
  10. Kenny
    Member

    I went to both EBC and Evans today to investigate tyres for dealing with the ice. I ride a road bike, 700x25 Gatorskins at the moment.

    What they told me surprised me - that they didn't want to sell me anything, because I was riding the best tyre for the conditions. They both said that tyres with tread would do virtually nothing in the ice, and that tyres with studs would actually be worse than with no studs, unless I was riding in the snow, which is what studs are apparently designed for.

    This seems to conflict with what a lot of people here seem to think regarding the studs. They were quite insistent that the studs were going to do nothing on the ice, and only make things worse on tarmac.

    What do you guys think about that?

    Posted 8 years ago #
  11. kaputnik
    Moderator

    @MKNS to that I would say "cobblers". I have 700x25c Gatorskins on my normal everyday bike, 700x32c Continental Touring Plus (light tread) on my touring bike. I've just invested in some lightly spiked Schwalbe Winter 700x30c for the touring bike - why? Because even the wider, lightly treaded tyre offers absolutely nothing on ice but slidyness. Turn on ice and you'll go down sideways as the wheel slides our under you. Try brake on ice and you'll begin to slide and then likely go down as the tyre begins to slide on the ice.

    The touring-type tyres were OK in proper, fresh snow I found winters before last, but when it came to compacted, refrozen slush, again the ride was very ropey. I agree with what the shop said about tread and no tread on ice - Bicycleworks said the same on tread vs. no tread for ice, and that the slick might even be better as it puts more rubber on the road than a knobble. A wide, semi-slick at low pressure probably the best non-specialist tyre for ice. Big footprint, some channels to clear away water of melting ice, and with a bit of sideways flexibility to counter the likelihood of wheelslide.

    The studs however stop / slow lateral sliding, wheel lock when braking and wheel spin when accelerating or trying to get uphill.

    There are a number of different stud / tread arrangements available. Chunky knobbles with lateral spikes are designed for off-road snow work. Central studs are suited to snowed / iced road/path work.

    Having now ridden my studs for only 3 days, including one frost day and one snow morning, I know which I'd rather be using on untreated surfaces.

    Posted 8 years ago #
  12. stiltskin
    Member

    Mkns.. They really don't know what they are talking about. The main problem with studs on ice comes when you stop, put a foot down and fall over. They are unbelievably good on ice! Studs are noisy & slow on tarmac but they are perfectly ok to use. The studs are not particularly useful on snow. Why would they be, but the heavy tread these tyres have is what deals with snow.

    Posted 8 years ago #
  13. SRD
    Moderator

    eching others...rubbish. folk who live in really snowy parts don't have much time for studs because it is heavy snow or plowed tarmac - thinking western canada here (but even there they do use them).

    our untreated roads and semi-treated paths definitely suited to studs.

    Now you see why lots of us shun ebc except for sales ;)

    Posted 8 years ago #
  14. Nelly
    Member

    +1 for last two or three comments, those you spoke to are talking garbage.

    Evans is a terrible shop - reminds me of halfords - been in twice, most of their staff dont have a scooby.

    And, while I dont have the same disdain for the staff (many of whom are very good) dare I say it, EBC doesnt appear to stock spikes........

    Posted 8 years ago #
  15. Smudge
    Member

    +1, tell the salesweasels they're talking rot.

    Posted 8 years ago #
  16. Kenny
    Member

    OK, seems like a consensus that I've been told nonsense. Any suggestions as to what I should do to combat future icy conditions? I don't think I can get tyres with studs since it's a road bike with limited clearance around the brakes. Having tyres with tread isn't going to do much on ice, and I cycle on roads and cycle paths only. I currently use conti gatorskins pumped up to very close to the maximum pressure.

    So what should a person on a road bike do to cope with the ice?

    Posted 8 years ago #
  17. wee folding bike
    Member

    http://www.schwalbe.co.uk/spikes/marathon-winter/

    Available as 35-622 700 x 35C

    I had to take the mudguard off but it was attached in an unusual way in the first place. The caliper brake works fine but it's not a racing one.

    Posted 8 years ago #
  18. Baldcyclist
    Member

    So what should a person on a road bike do to cope with the ice?

    If you are happy cycling on main roads, just avoid the cycle paths and you should get on fine with your gatorskins on all but the very worst days. When it snows, get the train/bus/car.

    Posted 8 years ago #
  19. amir
    Member

    "So what should a person on a road bike do to cope with the ice?
    "

    Be choosy about where and when you cycle!

    Posted 8 years ago #
  20. wingpig
    Member

    "So what should a person on a road bike do to cope with the ice?"

    Don't pump them up to the maximal pressure - go as low as 70 to give yourself some chance on anything icy or snowy or slushy. Sliding up the cobbles of the High Street two years ago on 700*23 Armadilloes at the minimal non-snakebite-puncturing pressure was markedly less slidey than attempting the same at 120psi.

    Posted 8 years ago #
  21. sallyhinch
    Member

    If you have to cycle on ice on non-studded tyres: as well as letting the tyres down a bit, keep your weight as far back as you can (never get out of the saddle), don't use your front brake - indeed don't brake at all if you can help it, and lower your saddle a little so you can get your feet down if necessary. I'll sometimes just scoot instead of ride, especially if going downhill as then I can stop with my feet. All of these will get you over the worst patches but it doesn't make for a fun ride. Definitely going down the bike shop for some studs as soon as I get back to the UK

    Some good tips here http://road.cc/content/feature/12090-roadccs-tips-riding-ice-and-snow

    Posted 8 years ago #
  22. Dave
    Member

    So what should a person on a road bike do to cope with the ice?

    According to A Well Known Methodology, you could:

    - "Avoid" (work from home)
    - "Fallback plan" (drive, or get a MTB with winter tyres?)
    - "Reduce" (fit tyres with tread, so that will at least mitigate snow, or get elbow/kneepads)
    - "Transfer" won't work, as no money is involved.
    - That just leaves "accept". Take your chances...

    I've ordered some thin studded tyres for the wife, so when they arrive we could try one on your bike to see if it will clear the brakes (nominally 28mm)

    Posted 8 years ago #
  23. Dave
    Member

    From a random comment on my review; thought it was rather timely for the staff of some LBS's... "I just tryed the marathon winter tire 700c*35 on the “Mont Royal” (Montréal). It was dramatic icy condition. On clean ice and snow it works like a charm I was amazed how confident it feels. On a rutted icy road it was an another game. I was still able to bike but with much care."

    Posted 8 years ago #
  24. DaveC
    Member

    I have found rutted ice difficult also, there was some on the Blackhall path up towards the west end of the path but its now a puddle.

    Warning, Oil and some minor ice on the corner as you come off Cramond Bridge (the old one) heading east on the left bend. Also minor ice on the 5 ways junction north of Tesco in Broughton. There are patches of ice on the feilds outside Edinburgh which shows that cold spots do exist in places.

    Posted 8 years ago #

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