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"Air pollution in Scotland 'creating public health crisis' "

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  1. chdot
    Admin

    1975 (act was ‘73).

    Posted 5 days ago #
  2. neddie
    Member

    Pedestrianise the High St. People can drive to it, but not through it. Those wanting to drive through can use the A1.

    Job done.

    Posted 5 days ago #
  3. gembo
    Member

    @neddie You are mental, they want to drive to the shops and park, as I stipulated. THey do not want to drive to some feckin carpark 500 metres away (e.g. both of the empty LIDL and ALDI carparks) and walk to the shops that is crazy. They want to queue up and down the highstreet in mad congestion, vainly searching for a parking space for ages like normal people.

    Posted 5 days ago #
  4. Cyclingmollie
    Member

    The air filter thing is the other side of the road in this typical photo of the High Street. Tesco has to take the blame for a lot of the traffic. It's located where the town centre station used to be before that was moved to the outskirts. The old railway line is now Olivebank Road.

    Posted 5 days ago #
  5. I were right about that saddle
    Member

  6. steveo
    Member

    Some one has been reading my posts shame it wasn't an Edinburgh Councillor...

    Posted 2 days ago #
  7. chdot
    Admin

    From link -

    Before the buses were free, fares raised around 10% of the network’s €47m (£41.6m) annual running costs. A further 60% was funded by the versement transport, a French public transport levy on companies and public bodies with more than 11 employees, and 30% came from the local authority. Vergriete says a rise in the company transport tax has made up the fare shortfall – meaning no rise in taxes for local households.

    So it *can’t* be done in UK.

    Posted 2 days ago #
  8. Morningsider
    Member

    43% of Scottish bus operator revenue comes from central and local government. In rural and island areas it is liable to be far higher, as some local authorities subsidise every bus that operates in their area. That doesn't take account of the fact that all bus infrastructure (shelters, bus lanes etc.) are installed and maintained at public expense.

    Details: https://www.transport.gov.scot/publication/scottish-transport-statistics-no-36-2017-edition/chapter-2-bus-and-coach-travel/

    Posted 2 days ago #
  9. crowriver
    Member

    Aye, but 43 as opposed to 90.

    From the link:

    ---

    In Paris the income from tickets on public transport is reported to make up half the running costs. When mayor Anne Hidalgo suggested she would look at scrapping fares, Frédéric Héran, a transport economist, said the measure “made no sense”.

    “Who will the new public transport users be?” he asked. “All studies have shown they will be cyclists, then pedestrians and very few motorists. This clearly shows it’s an anti-cycling, anti-pedestrian measure and not very discouraging to cars.”

    ---

    There's evidence to suggest that in Tallinn, drivers are still driving their cars just as much as they were before free public transport. The main impact seems to be a reduction in people walking. So I imagine that unless you make it more difficult for people to use their cars (as they apparently have in Dunkirk) then the effect of free public transport is to transfer people from getting around on foot to getting around by bus, tram etc.

    Posted 1 day ago #
  10. chdot
    Admin

    “as they apparently have in Dunkirk”

    Well there’s your “carrot and stick”.

    ‘We’ve introduced free transport and now we are going to make it harder to drive (like cities where you can only get from one part to another via a longer route) or more expensive (congestion charge).’

    Just needs a Gov that will let it happen without a referendum!

    Posted 1 day ago #

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