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Cargo bikes as a growth area for bicycle vs. auto trips

(20 posts)
  • Started 4 years ago by Kim
  • Latest reply from chdot
  • This topic is not resolved

  1. Kim
    Member

    Just come across this research paper Cargo bikes as a growth area for bicycle vs. auto trips: Exploring the potential for mode substitution behavior. What would get you to give up a car and use a cargo bike instead?

    Posted 4 years ago #
  2. neddie
    Member

    What would get you to give up a car and use a cargo bike instead?

    We would love to swap the car for a cargo bike, but you'll have to get my wife cycling first.

    As she grew up in Holland (and cycled there), that will not happen until conditions here become as pleasant and as safe.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  3. fimm
    Member

    Well, we don't own a car, but hire one when we need one. So the question to us would be "Under what circumstances, where you currently hire a car, would you use (a hired or owned) cargo bike instead?". And I don't think there are many - we already do our shopping in small loads, we don't have children to move, and when we do want to move stuff it is too much stuff and too far for a cargo bike to be an option (e.g. taking a bike or bikes to a triathlon or similar race).

    Posted 4 years ago #
  4. wingpig
    Member

    I'd happily get rid of my wife's car and join a car club, but she wouldn't. I'd get a cargo bike if I had sufficient money to buy one, somewhere safe to keep one, a garden gate wide enough to emit one and sufficient confidence in solid tyre technology to use them if the cargo bike had any inaccessible wheels. As it is, I'll probably get a Bike Hod at some point as a normal trailer is also too wide for the garden gate unless the wheels are removed.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  5. chdot
    Admin

    Change the situational awareness of the gateposts.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  6. crowriver
    Member

    I bought a cargo bike five years ago (Kona Ute) after experimenting with trailers. I still use both.

    The rationale was to avoid having to go down the car route, and so far it has worked for transporting big loads, kids and camping trips (hauling a trailer too). It was good to have when we moved house too.

    However, since acquiring a Pashley Pronto I find I'm hardly using the Ute. The Pronto is a more 'normal' looking bike, not as long, but has the incredibly useful forward cargo rack fixed to the frame. It also has hub gears, hub brakes and a dynamo so has needed very little maintenance so far.

    Now that the kids are bigger and can to a large extent transport themselves the Pronto is handier for daily use, shopping, allotment duties etc. and is easier to park: it fits at the foot of the tenement stair whereas the Ute lives in the garage a kilometre away. The only thing the Pronto could use is more gears: 5 or 8 speed would be great, the supplied SA 3-speed has a wide range, but the steps are large. In practice though, If I'm carrying much weight I'm in first gear anyway, so I don't know if would make that much difference...

    So I suppose I'd say that what you go for depends on what you need a load carrying bike for. For me, at the moment, a postal bike does the job. Indeed I probably don't need the Ute any more. I will be hanging on to my trailers though, as they can be used with almost any bike and are handy for heavier or bulkier/longer loads.

    If you have a couple of young kids, or your job/business involves ferrying around lots of stuff (not too heavy) relatively short distances, a Bakfiets or similar would be a good move. Otherwise consider a long tail cargo bike e.g.. Kona Ute, Xtracycle variant, or the rather pricer Surly Big Dummy. If it's just shopping or occasional loads, I reckon a trailer or something like the Pashley Pronto is ideal.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  7. Jester
    Member

    This takes me back. I had one of those trailers for my daughter. I misjudged the width of the gate and came to an abrupt halt, straight over the handlebars.
    Lesson learned...

    Posted 4 years ago #
  8. I were right about that saddle
    Member

    My guess is that secure storage is the killer once loss of status has been surmounted.

    They're expensive things to leave outdoors. Where would a tenement-dweller keep one?

    Posted 4 years ago #
  9. LaidBack
    Member

    UA / Bakfiets can be supplied with a bike cover and an extra chain that can plug into the frame lock to get it wrapped round something.

    I had to do lock and cover my first Thorn twin 26" wheeled tandem. Would not go up the stairs. I was sure someone would steal it but stayed in our yard for years in centre of town. There's a Nihola in Harrison Gardens that is out all the time.

    Enquiries here about load bikes tend to be viewed against having a second car. Once you find how quickly they move along and how fast loading up is many people are sold. The width of the UA is narrow enough to get through doorways. Nihola / Babboe / Christiana trikes are wider.

    Anyone looking at options could do a lot worse than hire out the UA. Electric Bike Co have a tilting trike demo from Butchers & Bicycles Co in Copenhagen.
    That means Edinburgh has two leading Eurobike prizewinning designs here to try in the city.
    Scotland has one dealer.
    Norway has 12 (!)

    B&B Tilting Electric Trike

    Posted 4 years ago #
  10. dessert rat
    Member

    indeed this is a timely thread.

    I am presently in negotiations / discussions / persuasion with Mrs McR of recently passed driving test, that a cargo bike or similar would be of more use/faster than a car for most of her and mini-McR's trips.

    We live in New Town, have a garage and she rarely goes more than a few 100m from NEPN or up to St Andrews Sq. or nursery somewhere up above Stockbridge in Jan.

    I was thinking of renting an Urban Arrow for a few days to see how it goes - not sure if that is the best option, but it the only option I'm aware of.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  11. Roibeard
    Member

    There are a variety of cargo bikes on the forum, including the electrically assisted Urban Arrow.

    In the New Town, I think the assist might be nice, but if you wish to try a Bullitt (not assisted, although available as an option), then PM me.

    Robert

    Posted 4 years ago #
  12. nobrakes
    Member

    For what its worth, I had 4 bikes and a tag along stored in our front garden in morningside for 5 years. Chained to a drainpipe under a couple of oxford covers in full view of passers by. Never had any trouble or attempts to steal.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  13. Harts Cyclery
    Member

    I let one of the shop lads have the shop Kangoo over the summer, so I used the Gazelle Cabby (non-electric) a lot. You can fit pretty much any load in it that you'd be able to fit in a small hatch back, including loads of pretty much any height.

    I take my daughter to nursery and her Granny's 3 days a week and it's handy because I don't have to faff about with packing panniers etc. I just chuck everything in the cargo area beside my daughter's feet. I also take her to a class on a Friday morning. I do about 45 miles a week on it - good training!

    The Cabby is available to demo or hire any time. Just give me a shout.

    Posted 4 years ago #
  14. Kim
    Member

    I am curious about the issue of tenement living with a cargo bike, its as if Copenhagen and Amsterdam don't have tenemented housing? Of course they do, all the European brands of cargo bike are designed to be kept out of doors. Just use a big chain and ground anchor if needs be, then stick a cover over the top.

    Width wise, I can get the Urban Arrow through gaps that a trailer will struggle with. Yes the trikes are wider, that's on of the down sides of a trike.

    Load wise, it makes the shopping so easy, just chuck it in the front and ride a way, no faffing with panniers, it makes life so much easier.

    Distance? I have met a Dutch couple with their two kids who were on their way home from Argyle and the Trossachs. They had cycled there from the Netherlands via the Amsterdam/Newcastle Ferry, with an Urban Arrow (OK they did have two batteries).

    Posted 4 years ago #
  15. wingpig
    Member

  16. LaidBack
    Member

    Good article. Even a decent basket or front rack can expand a solo bike for a small cost. For heavier stuff a rack does need struts onto front fork (like my daughter's nicked Dawes Duchess - top Cambodian bike!).
    Work cycles also supply bikes with tubes welded onto downtube to plug in a platform rack of postal strength - may be like Elephant Bike?

    UA posted this video. Traffic in Amsterdam now looks worse than here in some areas as internet boosts just in time deliveries Small van and truck sales have increased 25% there. They want to sell alternatives.

    [+] Embed the video | Video DownloadGet the Flash Videos

    Posted 4 years ago #
  17. chdot
    Admin

    “Zedify is tackling a very serious problem, air pollution and carbon emissions in cities, in a huge, fast-growing market – local deliveries,” said Pradayrol. “The company has developed an efficient and differentiated solution, combining electric trikes and local depots. Zedify already shows serious traction and its franchise model will enable for rapid growth. I am really humbled and excited by this opportunity to support Rob, Sam and the team, who combine a great sense of purpose and a very successful track record in the market.”


    https://www.bikebiz.com/zedify-raises-over-300000-from-private-investors/amp

    Posted 1 year ago #
  18. LaidBack
    Member

    As noted elsewhere... only the strict limitation of allowing polluting vans & HGVs into cities can stabalise this market.
    FarrOut in Edinburgh have just done a report that I'll share later.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  19. chdot
    Admin

    “In the past, I’ve used it to transport king sized beds and washing machines with no issues.”

    https://www.helensburghadvertiser.co.uk/news/19279396.cycle-logical-mode-transport-tall-bike-teen-alex/

    Posted 4 months ago #
  20. chdot
    Admin

    Raleigh, one of the world’s biggest bike brands, launched its first electric cargo bikes this week, and the company’s UK managing director, Lee Kidger, predicts that the UK market for these cycle workhorses will soar to 15 times its current level within five years. The Nottingham-based firm only began selling cargo bikes a few years ago but sales spiked 75% last year.

    https://www.theguardian.com/business/2021/jul/24/cycling-brands-gear-up-for-rapid-growth-in-uk-cargo-bike-market

    Posted 2 months ago #

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