CityCyclingEdinburgh Forum » Infrastructure

OT Cundy/Koondy and lost marbles

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  1. gembo
    Member

    The other day chatting to the farmer on the coach road out of stow she mentioned the water board had damaged the Cundy eight years back and the road closure ( to cars) was to repair the culvert. Not a word I was familiar with although I have a vague memory of the ditty

    Wee johnny's lost his jaurie
    He lost it at the Broomielaw
    It rolled right down the Cundy.

    Which transpires is a variant of the Geordie song

    Wor Geordie's lost his Penka

    In Newcastle the drain is called The Koondy.

    Lest you be upset at this loss of a prize marble, fear not. Johnnie/Geordie finds it later in his pocket.

    No marbles are lost in any of the regional variations.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  2. Cyclingmollie
    Member

    Yes, cundy is a word I heard used when I was young.

    Earlier this week in a cafe in Edinburgh I was confused by the lack of a flush handle on the toilet until I realised it was a shunkie.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  3. Tulyar
    Member

    Cundy = Northern appropriation of Conduit, As in Conduit Street/Lamb's Conduit Street* etc (street with river running beneath it).

    *I'm sure that @Laidback and @arellcat will know of the latter London throughfare in which there is one of London's most curmudgeonly friendly bike shop proprietors, eager to help with a selection of high performance cycles ... and 8Freights

    Posted 2 months ago #
  4. Tulyar
    Member

    Oh & @gembo my version was lost his liggie (a device with a flint and quantity of 'liggie jooce') which he lost alang the Scotswood Road.

    Said liggie is found in the next verse, and the final verse affirms that it was in his ***in pocket

    Posted 2 months ago #
  5. gembo
    Member

    @tulyar, I think I have been in a pub in Lamb's Conduit Street.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  6. I were right about that saddle
    Member

    I wondered if comrade @gembo had achieved his ultimate aim here: a thread which is interesting yet impossible to reply to.

    Anyway, talk of lambs' conduits puts me in mind of Leopold Bloom's dinner;

    "Most of all he liked grilled mutton kidneys which gave to his palate a fine tang of faintly scented urine."

    Posted 2 months ago #
  7. gembo
    Member

    @iwrats, who can say, love you bringing in Poldy.

    The Lamb pub in Lamb's Conduit Street. Was a Young's pub, one would walk for miles to find a Young's pub in the day. Charles Wells of Bedford now own Young's.

    Snob screens abound in The Lamb, with etched glass. You can then travel up Holborn way and visit the mad sculpture amusement arcade that is an offshoot of the one on Southwold Pier.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  8. Arellcat
    Moderator

    *I'm sure that @Laidback and @arellcat will know of the latter London throughfare in which there is one of London's most curmudgeonly friendly bike shop proprietors, eager to help with a selection of high performance cycles ... and 8Freights

    No, curmudgeonly is about right. ;)

    "
    There lieth a street from Newgate west to the end of Turnagaine lane, and winding north to Oldborne conduit. This conduit by Oldborne cross was first built in 1498. Thomasin, widow to John Percival, mayor, gave to the second making thereof twenty marks, Richard Shore ten pounds. Thomas Knesworth and others also did give towards it.

    But of late a new conduit was there built in place of the old, namely, in the year 1577, by William Lambe, sometime a gentleman of the chapel to King Henry VIII., and afterward a citizen and clothworker of London; the water thereof he caused to be conveyed in lead, from divers to springs to one head, and from thence to the said conduit, and waste of one cock at Oldborne bridge, more than two thousand yards in length; all of which was by him performed at his own charges, amounting to the sum of fifteen hundred pounds.
    "

    Just off Lamb's Conduit Street on Long Yard is an inscribed lintel, which is all that remains of the head of the conduit.

    "
    Lamb's Conduit the Property of the City of London this Pump is Erected for the Benefit of the Publick
    "

    Posted 2 months ago #
  9. gembo
    Member

    Lamb's Conduit seems to be about bringing water to you whereas the stow coach road farmer's Cundy is about taking water away

    Posted 2 months ago #
  10. Cyclingmollie
    Member

    The repair seems to be complete and the road is open again.

    20181018_133539 by Tom Orr, on Flickr

    Posted 2 months ago #
  11. ejstubbs
    Member

    In Cambridge there is Hobson's Conduit, the Trumpington Street branch of which has claimed many an unobservant pedestrianiser, bicycler and drivist over the years. Unlikely as it seems, this open channel by the side of a major road was designed to bring fresh water to the city.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  12. gembo
    Member

    Last night I put my version of my Jaurie - little moon rechargeable straight into USB without lead back light in my pocket as thought I won't put it on just to take it off when go into GP. When I went to put it on, it was not in my pocket. The opposite of Wee Johnnie where he thought his jaurie rolled down the cundy but found it later in his pocket.

    Road repair looks good and the bridge they fixed in the summer also good.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  13. Arellcat
    Moderator

    Just off Lamb's Conduit Street on Long Yard is an inscribed lintel, which is all that remains of the head of the conduit.

    And here is that lintel:


    The conduit of William Lambe

    Posted 1 month ago #
  14. gembo
    Member

    Nice lintel for the benefit of the Publick

    Posted 1 month ago #

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