CityCyclingEdinburgh Forum » Computers, GPS, 'Smart' 'Phones

Raspberry Pi

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  1. chdot
    Admin

    NOTHING to do with cycling - or food...

    This is all over radio, TV and 'net today - The Raspberry Pi computer goes on general salehttp://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-17190918

    I know that this forum has a disproportionate number of people with an interest (often professional) in computers.

    Was wondering if this is 'true' -

    "
    But the Pi does have its doubters, like technology journalist Michael Rockman, who recently wrote: "Today's kids aren't interested (in coding). The world has moved on…what makes their applications work or what is inside the black box is as interesting as the washing machine or vacuum cleaner.

    "I've long thought that there is a bubble of tech; people of my age are more techie than their children."

    "

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-17192823

    Posted 2 years ago #
  2. steveo
    Member

    I nearly got up to try and order one but figured the servers would melt down. Farnell, one of worlds largest electronics distributors, has only just started to come back to life.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  3. chdot
    Admin

    @steveo

    So, you're in the "bubble of tech"(?)

    Posted 2 years ago #
  4. holisticglint
    Member

    Sort of true I'd guess. The number of candidates for higher computing has been around 4K for years - not what I would call popular. It could be that there is not enough promotion of computing in schools especially with no clear successor to the BBC Micro and a lack of teachers with a suitable background - which is what the Raspberry Pi is supposed to address.

    When it comes down to it coding is hard and requires practice, patience and concentration to learn (much like maths) which is not a skill set normally associated with teenagers.

    It is always going to be a niche subject but efforts like Raspberry Pi are worthwhile to ensure that as many people as possible at least get a chance at trying their hand at it.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  5. chdot
    Admin

    @holisticglint

    That's sounds like a better assessment (and more optimistic) than technology journalist Michael Rockman" 's quote.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  6. holisticglint
    Member

    Thinking about it - the processor on these boards is from the previous generation of mobile phones. If you have an Android smartphone you already have access to a phenomenally powerful Linux based platform with a very good development system.

    http://developer.android.com/index.html

    Posted 2 years ago #
  7. steveo
    Member

    So, you're in the "bubble of tech"(?)

    I'm only more techy than my child by virtue of him being 1. ;)

    I'm definitely more techy than your average person, potentially because I grew up in the C64/bbc micro generation, but whether i'm more techy than your average 18 year old I don't know.

    I'm the computer support for my family but there are only a couple of cousins younger than me and the only one who ever asks me any thing is a primary school teacher, not sure what that says...

    Posted 2 years ago #
  8. Cyclingmollie
    Member

    holisticglint: "If you have an Android smartphone you already have access to a phenomenally powerful Linux based platform with a very good development system."

    I agree, I managed to create a "whack a daughter" game (think whack a rat but with my youngest's head instead of the rat).

    I'm not sure how exciting the Rapberry Pi will be to children. I saw pupils programming micro-chips at the last school open day I was at so they already have access to quite powerful tools.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  9. SRD
    Member

    Both Mr SRD and I are solid arts/social science folks, and I lay no claim at all to computing skill of any sort but we both said this morning 'maybe we should get one of those'.

    Maybe it is generational...we had a ZX-81 when I was a bit too young to appreciate it, and I was given an early hand-me-down apple 2+ by family friends when I started University.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  10. crowriver
    Member

    I'm considering one for No.1 son. I recall fooling around on various friends' ZX Spectrums in the 1980s. You get an appreciation that it's the code that runs the machine...

    Posted 2 years ago #
  11. gembo
    Member

    What the chap said that was telling, before the websites crashed was - if you say "Design your own app" people like the sound of it but if you say "learn how to programme" they don't.

    R4 Today programme has been trailing this Raspberry Pi before. The whole history of the BBC computers is interesting. Acorn rather than Apple.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  12. LaidBack
    Member

    If you have an Android smartphone you already have access to a phenomenally powerful Linux based platform

    I was wondering whether a Linux enthusiast might have a 'pure' Linux smartphone without all these annoying little icons on it... ;-)

    Mind you the key pad wouldn't work would it.....?

    Anyway I'm a fake  phone user now... able to look at all my emails twice now so I can save time.. (?)

    Posted 2 years ago #
  13. Stepdoh
    Member

    Geeky question here, but did anyone like the single button shortcut basic model that Spectrums had?

    I always thought it was rubbish, but was coming from a solidly commodore (Plus 4, 64C, Amiga 1200) background.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  14. wingpig
    Member

    It was the first thing I encountered, so it didn't seem weird. I didn't have any problem with spelling but it made it handier to know that commands were correctly-spelled. Also, many an idle moment could be spent pressing and holding a key so that it printed RANDOMIZE RANDOMIZE RANDOMIZE all the way along and down the screen, increasingly slowly as it filled up...

    Posted 2 years ago #
  15. cb
    Member

    It was probably helpful on the rubbish keyboards of the ZX81 and Sinclair Spectrum.

    My brother had a ZX81 but I don't remember typing much more than
    10 PRINT"HELLO"
    20 GOTO 10

    Then we had a Plus 4 (Stepdoh must have had the other one) then various Amstrad CPCs. With computers like that you just had to stand back and watch all your friends swap games at school.

    Keep meaning to drag my old CPC 664 out and see if I can transfer some of the stuff I wrote for it over to an emulator. I doubt the drive belt for the 3" disk drive will still be up to turning the disk...

    Posted 2 years ago #
  16. chdot
    Admin

    "I doubt the drive belt for the 3" disk drive will still be up to turning the disk..."

    Other rubber bands are available.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  17. Stepdoh
    Member

    Yay cb, another +4 user! Remember the design was way ahead of anything at the time. Sadly it was a c16 with a bit more (usually unutilised) ram inside an amiga 600 chassis.

    Getting a 64 after it almost felt like a step back.

    Very good point on the spec keyboards, not so good for touchtyping, so it's actually quite a neat little solution.

    WP, when doing basic in Commodore you always had to remember that it was spelled 'COLOR'

    Posted 2 years ago #
  18. cb
    Member

    "Sadly it was a c16 with a bit more (usually unutilised) ram inside"

    Summer Events and Winter Events by Udo Gertz were probably the pinacle of +4 gaming.
    For some strange reason I was able to remember the name of the programmer whilst I can barely remember my own birthday these days.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  19. Stepdoh
    Member

    I had that, it was amazing. I think several quickshot joysticks were knackered on that one.

    Joystick, remember that word kids. Think it has a slightly grubbier meaning these days, but those were innocent times.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  20. amir
    Member

    We seemed to do a lot of "PEEK"ing and "POKE"ing in those early days

    Posted 2 years ago #
  21. Stepdoh
    Member

    This was my joystick of choice though, possibly the most eighties looking device ever made. Even had torque control.

    PS, if you're ever feeling nostalgic about the controllers of yore, go here and remember how absoultely guff they all were...

    http://members.optusnet.com.au/spacetaxi64/MAIN/JOYSTICK-MUSEUM.htm

    Posted 2 years ago #

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