CityCyclingEdinburgh Forum » Cycling News

Cyclists make a difference....or it seems that we can

(12 posts)
  • Started 2 years ago by Claggy Cog
  • Latest reply from Wilmington's Cow

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  1. Claggy Cog
    Member

  2. Dave
    Member

    I really think this is the next step - the #cyclingvote idea is something I'd really like to see expanded (Spokes being somewhat reluctant to get overtly partisan, which I can understand).

    When elections are often decided by a small swing vote, it's possibly for a relatively small number of people who're passionate enough to influence outcomes. There were only a dozen votes in it in Newington/Southside last time around between a Green and Libdem councillor, which is only 6 cyclists voting as a block.

    A few on here have commented that they find it odd to vote based on cycling, but I find it hard to see many differences between the parties on other things I really care about (are we going to spend a few million privatising or nationalising service Y in Edinburgh? Who cares, it's a thousandth of our tram debt.)

    Posted 2 years ago #
  3. Instography
    Member

    It's also just a voter-side development of the increasing Americanisation or increasingly Presidential style of politics that is developing in the UK. In the States it would be standard for the parties to court the votes of organised interest groups and the interest groups organise themselves to be courted.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  4. "are we going to spend a few million privatising or nationalising service Y in Edinburgh?"

    That depends on whether you see it as the outlay figure, or what happens to that service after privatisation. For me those are big tickets things, its proportion of the tram budget is meaningless; its real-life impact is important.

    However, for daily cycling commuters it also makes perfect sense to vote according to cycling policy as, day in day out, if that (good) policy is actually put into practice it will have a direct affect on me virtually every single day.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  5. Claggy Cog
    Member

    MMmmm Insto - how does that work out. Do the interest groups actually get anything that they cite they want, one wonders. Looking at American politics from this side of the pond, it would not seem so.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  6. Min
    Member

    Yes, I agree re. voting due to cycling policy. It is the thing which has the greatest impact on me day to day and which will (potentially) have the greatest impact on the city overall as a place to live.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  7. Instography
    Member

    I don't know. My entire understanding of American politics is derived from seven seasons of the West Wing.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  8. Stepdoh
    Member

    Instography, i wouldn't really see that as Americanisation.

    Unions, City, churches etc all have two way relationships with political parties, and then promote to their members/followers. Patronage is always a part of politics. I think when money comes into it, that's when the real Americanization starts.

    Having a cycling lobby big enough to be listened to would be a very good thing.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  9. Dave
    Member

    One of the solid signs of this happening has been the IAM moving into cycling "turf".

    This way, any rise in cycling power reinforces their own power (I don't mean this in an eerie conspiracy theory sounding way - but if road focus moves away from "cars at any cost" there's obviously a huge advantage to your lobby group being positioned as a first port of call regardless).

    Although I hardly think cyclists as a lobby group are at the stage where we need to worry about being co-opted by motoring orgs... yet ;-)

    Posted 2 years ago #
  10. Instography
    Member

    It's also quite clever marketing to cyclists. IAM, an organisation for people who drive and are concerned about driving standards and road safety. Much like you cycling people. And look, we campaign for cyclists interests too.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  11. SRD
    Member

    I'm sure there is at least as much lobbying in UK/parliamentary politics as in American/presidential style, but probably less big bucks. Main difference is that US politics has a lot more cross-party alliances on key issues. Parliamentary votes tend to be much more strict and party lines adhered to.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  12. "Parliamentary votes tend to be much more strict and party lines adhered to."

    That's something that really, really annoys me about our system. Party Politics, by their very nature, lead to regimented enforced lack of representation of the people of a constituency. I'm not advocating an anarchic every-man-for-himself system, but MPs (and MSPs and Councillors) are ostensibly voted in to represent everyone within their remit, NOT the party.

    Posted 2 years ago #

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