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"Growing Up in Scotland: Overweight, obesity and activity

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  1. chdot
    Admin

    "
    Physical activity (but not screen time) varied strongly with daylight hours, indicating the importance of outdoor activities and (possibly) when children are able to walk or cycle to school more safely.

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    "
    Physical activity for 60 minutes or more, seven days a week
    At sweep 6, mothers were asked about their child’s participation in four types of physical activity (for at least 5 minutes) in the past week. For activities outside school, these included walking, organised sports or exercise activities such as swimming lessons or a gymnastics class, and other active behaviour such as running about, riding a bicycle or kicking a ball around. Mothers were also asked whether their child had taken part in walking, sports, exercise or other active things when the child was at school.

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    "
    Ogilvie, D., K. E. Lamb, et al. (2011). “Recreational physical activity facilities within walking and cycling distance: Sociospatial patterning of access in Scotland.” Health & Place 17(5): 1015-1022.

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    http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2012/05/5385/0

    Posted 5 years ago #
  2. Min
    Member

    Really interesting study, the almost complete inability of mothers to recognise that their children are overweight or obese is pretty startling.

    Clearly the answer is treadmill-powered computer games..

    Posted 5 years ago #
  3. chdot
    Admin

  4. calmac
    Member

    Wow. And there was me thinking fathers had children too.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  5. Instography
    Member

    Fathers father children. Mothers bring them up.

    But this is how Growing Up In Scotland is designed - to interview mothers and collect data about children. It's nothing personal. It's just that on the whole mothers are better able to answer questions about children than fathers and in many families fathers aren't there to answer.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  6. kaputnik
    Moderator

    Roads to drive there on. Shopping sheds with ample parking. Takeaway joints to feast in. Lack of walking/cycling access. The "Obesogenic environment".

    (Think pretty much any "retail" experience/destination built in Scotland in last 10-15 years)

    Posted 3 years ago #
  7. chdot
    Admin

  8. Kim
    Member

    Kids love to get out and run around, ride bikes and play, what stops them here is our road environment, you only have to cross the North Sea to see this. I am told by members of the motoring lobby that is because the culture is different on the Continent, to which the only answer is, yes over there they love their children...

    Posted 3 years ago #
  9. chdot
    Admin

    Meanwhile in England

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-27712381

    (Won't be much different here.)

    Posted 3 years ago #
  10. chdot
    Admin

    "

    And the huge financial burden on the NHS may eventually force ministers into more action. "The government has to be much more nanny state in terms of policing the food industry, taxing snack food, taxing fizzy drinks, banning fizzy drinks, banning sugary foods, and not just in school dinners but also in work canteens and hospital food. Every kind of food provision has to be much more controlled by the government. Then they have to put money into cycle paths and street lighting and redesign their cities so that it is much more easy for people to be physically active."

    "

    http://www.theguardian.com/society/2014/jun/21/how-britain-got-so-fat-obese

    Posted 3 years ago #
  11. chdot
    Admin

  12. crowriver
    Member

    In the eyes of UK law, biscuits and cakes are considered necessities and are zero-rated for VAT.

    However, chocolate-covered biscuits are regarded as a luxury, which means the full rate of VAT is payable.

    Good grief.

    Biscuits are only a 'necessity' if one is imbibing a nice cup of tea. Oh wait...

    Posted 3 years ago #
  13. chdot
    Admin

  14. I were right about that saddle
    Member

    My brother was doctor in Monklands district general for a while. The canteen there - in a hospital -served tinned spaghetti as a 'vegetable'. Wheat, tomatoes and sugar cane were involved in the dish to some extent I suppose. Monklands has, of course, good claim to being the world epicentre of cardiac ill-health.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  15. PS
    Member

    "Vegetable" as opposed to "animal" or "mineral", I suppose...

    Posted 3 years ago #
  16. chdot
    Admin

    Posted 3 years ago #
  17. chdot
    Admin

  18. Nelly
    Member

    Weird article in some ways.

    Re: children's healthy weight interventions it states that"Nearly half of those children were from deprived areas"

    So am I to presume that over half are NOT from deprived areas? And what does that tell us?

    Posted 3 years ago #
  19. chdot
    Admin

    "And what does that tell us?"

    That there is an 'obsession' with 'deprivation' and/or that as "deprived areas" are presumably less than half, there is a disproportionate problem in them(?)

    Posted 3 years ago #
  20. Instography
    Member

    I haven't seen the report but 'deprived' usually means the 15% most deprived areas so if half come from areas that only represent 15% of the population then obesity is a big problem.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  21. calmac
    Member

    "My brother was doctor in Monklands district general for a while."

    In Airdrie Sheriff Court, Monklands hospital is known as the pearly gates.

    Posted 3 years ago #
  22. chdot
    Admin

    "

    Is the lack of physical activity strategy for children complicit mass child neglect?

    "

    Last par -

    "

    Can we really afford to continue allowing our children and schools to have no childhood physical activity strategy, no mandatory school physical education time, no physical education quality expectations, selling of school playing fields, virtually non-existent investment in physical education, and lack of provision to non-sporting physical activity opportunities? We call on the state, education authorities and the public to put a stop to the ongoing child physical activity neglect, take responsibility and develop a strategy of substance.

    "

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/90pztsf3s1zub3b/Br%20J%20Sports%20Med-2014-Weiler-1010-3.pdf

    Presumably mostly about England (and related to Olympic 'legacy'), but....

    Posted 3 years ago #
  23. chdot
    Admin

    "

    More than 700 have been referred to NHS Lothian’s paediatric weight management programme in the past three years – with funding for the service increasing by more than a third.

    Around one in seven Scottish children aged between two and 15 are classed as obese. Last year more than 3500 primary one pupils were clinically or severely obese when they started school – up almost 400 on the previous year.

    Health experts warned that more babies were being born fat to overweight mothers and were living increasingly sedentary, inactive lifestyles.

    "

    http://www.edinburghnews.scotsman.com/news/health/obesity-crisis-kids-aged-two-sent-to-nhs-fat-camps-1-3847816

    Posted 2 years ago #
  24. chdot
    Admin

    "

    The number of people living with diabetes has soared by nearly 60% in the past decade, Diabetes UK warns.

    ...

    Diabetes UK called for the NHS to improve care for patients and for greater efforts to prevent diabetes.

    "

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-33932930

    Posted 2 years ago #
  25. Nelly
    Member

    Before I start ranting, I should say I am no sylph and at 6 foot and 14 stone, my BMI technically puts me in the podgy territory !!

    But......£8 Bn a year spent on treating Type 2 (the one caused by lifestyle) diabetes.

    Its wierd, I didnt think I knew anyone with diabetes - but if 5% of the country has it, there must be a fair few in my office of ~2000 bodies (given the shape some of them are in, ahem......).

    I used to think the increasing number of very large people would magically reduce - perhaps as a realisation kicked in that being obese was in fact dangerous?

    But - based again on my office and the odd excursion to a shopping mall - the number and girths of younger fat people are expanding.

    IMHO we are reaching the stage where the only people who look what I would call 'normal' are those over 35/40.

    My wife blames the big food companies, and I agree to an extent, they pump foods full of fat and sugar as it is 'cheap and tasty'.

    But there must come a time when you take some personal responsibility - perhaps think " have put a stone on in the last year, this cant go on"?

    I feel that the premise of the film Wall-E is coming to life.................

    Posted 2 years ago #
  26. bax
    Member

    The condition even leads to 135 foot amputations every week across the country

    crikey

    Posted 2 years ago #
  27. PS
    Member

    IMHO we are reaching the stage where the only people who look what I would call 'normal' are those over 35/40.

    Thing is, you don't need to look abnormally fat to be at risk of type 2. A considerable proportion of my 70 year old father in law's pals have been diagnosed as type 2, and you wouldn't necessarily pick them out as obese. Not thin, admittedly, but the worst you'd probably say is that the middle aged spread had kept spreading a wee bit. A working life's snacking regime involving meringues and mars bars seems to be enough to make you reach for the insulin.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  28. sallyhinch
    Member

    There was a thing on Inside Health on Radio 4 the other week about pre-diabetes, which seemed to suggest that by our 70s most of us will have our blood sugar creeping up, regardless of lifestyle. Some of the rise may also be people getting picked up earlier (which is no bad thing given the complications if it's untreated) - even before any symptoms appear. So in an average workplace there likely won't be many with diabetes yet (although many will be heading that way)

    Posted 2 years ago #
  29. paddyirish
    Member

    Guardian Article

    "But the only way that the tide will be turned is in a massive change in the way we lead our lives. Sport has to come back into schools, playing fields reclaimed and repurchased, cycling made safe and walking to school become the norm."

    Posted 2 years ago #
  30. chdot
    Admin


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