CityCyclingEdinburgh Forum » Debate!

rest up or press on

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  1. Min
    Member

    I have done multi day endurance events and don't have a problem with stopping overnight. A bothy would be a luxury. Getting up and doing it all again the next day was already trained for. Therefore I disagree that it is "better" to press on. It would be down to personal preference and nothing more IMO.

    Posted 1 week ago #
  2. steveo
    Member

    I have done multi day endurance events

    Statutory reminder that min is mad :p

    Cheers min, I think partly what I miss in "training" for my trips is the next day, if I've over done it the day before it is a total bear to get going again.

    Posted 1 week ago #
  3. Min
    Member

    Well you knew that already. ;-)

    I would say that if you were already overdoing it in your halfway stop scenario, imagine how you would feel the next day/week if you kept going? :-o

    Posted 1 week ago #
  4. steveo
    Member

    imagine how you would feel the next day/week if you kept going?

    Broken. Don't need to imagine. :)

    Posted 1 week ago #
  5. unhurt
    Member

    @iwrats Oh don't worry, there will be a Solemn League and Covenant to set out the ground rules.

    Highly reassuring. Carry on.

    I once got up on day n of a trip, took the tent down, packed, rode a whole 2km, turned left to admire the terrifying replacement Wawa goose and get a coffee and... just decided to check into a motel and sleep for most of the next 24 hours. Ended up staying two nights. It was raining? But, um. Yes. Sometimes you just want to sleeeeeeeeeeep. And eat doritos and muffins in bed.

    Posted 1 week ago #
  6. gembo
    Member

    Miles back about the halfway stop off point of this thread @cyclingmollie, there is a pop up disco during ride to the sun around the darkest point. The chipper in Moffat also stays open late for those wishing to stock up before the beef tub.

    I run a pop up wine bar up the back of POP. Red tablecloth over the wee wall, CND banner for reasons nowt to do with me, tho obviously we do not dig trident at the POP pop up wine bar (given the amount of cheap prosecco and amyl nitrate we serve) let's call it Poppers. Of course some top end French red is also available.

    I am also a great fan of the stop off bar. A lovely one in Mahon, Minorca, which is just a kiosk in a little square near the water where there is a trinket market, which was less than half way from restaurant street to hotel. Actually it was two feet from the restaurant but the kids went home and I had a quadruple brandy with my sister in law's husband. I had said to him we would stop off on the way home but had forgotten for reason of drink just how close it was to the restaurant. Fortunately it was very weak brandy. The lads running it found my Spanish amusing and gave us peanuts on the house and charged peanuts for the brandy on a warm summer's night. Or if in Lisbon, halfway down the steps from the Barrio alto at the Rossio Station there is a railway workers' bar I have often stopped off at.

    Sounds like I am not one for pushing on if there is a stop off on the route

    Posted 1 week ago #
  7. crowriver
    Member

    If this is just for pleasure, and not "training", then the key consideration has to be tiredness. If as you say the distance attempted is at the end of your range, can you reasonably accomplish it in say 12 to 14 hours riding? If not, then for safety's sake you should plan in a break for a sleep.

    I've experienced falling asleep on the bike in the middle of the night. I was rying to get back to bed, having bailed on a 300km audax a couple of hours earlier, and very tired due to being underslept the night before the event. While I didn't fall off nor sustain any injuries before waking up, that was a minor miracle really.

    If it's a pleasure ride, no need to risk being over tired and putting your safety at risk.

    Posted 1 week ago #
  8. amir
    Member

    It's all very personal. In Audax 400 km seems to be threshold when some prefer a wee kip and others not. First time I did one, I was very much of the opinion that I needed a sleep in an event that has a time limit of 27 hours. And many agree with that. But I woke the next day pretty shattered and my average speed was done by about 4 mph despite it being flatter.

    Since then all my 400s have been without a sleep stop. But with plenty of good cafe stops.

    I've only done one 600 so far (you get 41 hours I think) and I really needed to stop for a sleep on that. Given I'm not adventurous enough to want to bivvy, my stopping point was constrained (at about 320 if I remember rightly).

    I should hand over to the maestros of multiday events, Hankchief, DaveC and DrAfternoon

    Posted 1 week ago #
  9. fimm
    Member

    I think that we are being told that we are to assume that this is not an Audax - there are no time pressures. The choice is between two short days with a (possibly basic) overnight stop or one long day that is likely to leave you very tired for the following day - effectively one long day and then a recovery day.

    I think I would be more likely to choose the two short days if the aim of the journey was to enjoy the place I was journeying through, maybe to have time to stop and explore, not have time pressures, etc, etc.

    If the aim of the journey was to do a long distance in one day, then that's what I'd do (and the potential half way stop becomes irrelevant because it is unlikely that the wheels would be coming off that badly that early on - it is more likely that a bail out point at four fifths or five sixths distance becomes of interest). Such a journey can of course still be enjoyed for scenery, place etc, but it is a different experience.

    Posted 6 days ago #
  10. steveo
    Member

    Cheers Fimm. A very good case for it depends on what one is aiming for. :D

    Posted 6 days ago #
  11. unhurt
    Member

    @gembo

    cheap prosecco and amyl nitrate

    Now I know where I will be all afternoon at PoP 2018. It'll be like Calton Studios c. 1992 (might have to bring a bottle of Newky Brown to complete the feel).

    Posted 6 days ago #
  12. gembo
    Member

    @unhurt did you ever come across Murray the Naked Man at Calton Studios? Or his naked wife at the Venue? Maybe they were bit earlier than 1992. They were connected to the magazine Shavers Weekly who ran the Sunday night club Gassed All Weekend with DJ Fred Deacon (struction)? At Poppers two years ago we had a nearly naked woman who had covered herself in bread rolls and cling film. She stormed the grassy knoll where the speakers were demanding Rolls for women but @arobcomp told her to beat it,

    Posted 6 days ago #
  13. unhurt
    Member

    @gembo I did not! And I asked the brother whose friends folks used to run the place, and he doesn't recall either. Though he did know a Murray who worked security there - maybe he reformed? I mostly wanted to be at The Venue for preference from c. 1989 onwards (or, um, The Mission), but I was never there half as often as I wanted to be. Am sure I'd recall a naked wife. Though, I was at that PoP and didn't see Bread Roll Clingfilm Activist, so...

    @Snowy wishes to know if you ever went to something called the Purple Moon.

    Posted 6 days ago #
  14. gembo
    Member

    @unhurt, @snowy, was more Green Tree than Purple Moon

    Pere Ubu played the Venue at this time and Mrs Murray the Naked Man appeared on stage. David Thomas the euphonium playing frontman stormed off. The rest of Pere Ubu kept playing until he eventually returned. My pal Mr McHenry who was at the gig but somehow detached denied for many years this happened but now he accepts it did (having befriended a third person much later on who was also there that night).

    Anyone with a spare day should read The Pere Ubu Codex. Amazing insight into the mind of David Thomas.

    Posted 6 days ago #

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