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News on LTNs? (Leith/Corstorphine/East Craigs Connections/Oxford)

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  1. chdot
    Admin

  2. neddie
    Member

    Uuurgh. Save yourself the bother of clicking the link

    Awful article

    Posted 2 years ago #
  3. Arellcat
    Moderator

    "as cabbies now literally have to go round the houses to get us there."

    Yes. That is how it works.

    Haringey says:

    "Every home in a LTN can be accessed by car and can receive deliveries to their doors but some residents and businesses will have to take different routes to their destinations in the LTN area which might be less convenient. Getting used to these changes can take time which can be disruptive in the short term. These impacts however can depend greatly on how an LTN designed and where filters are located. Therefore, we need your views to help
    develop a successful scheme that works for the community as a whole. Any inconvenience caused is more than outweighed by the elimination of through traffic which will result in safer and less polluted streets."

    Posted 2 years ago #
  4. gembo
    Member

    Yes we are all in this together and some of us will be affected but it is for the greater good.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  5. chdot
    Admin

  6. chdot
    Admin

    Road injuries halved in low-traffic neighbourhoods installed during the coronavirus pandemic when compared against areas without the schemes, a new study has found.

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/jul/23/low-traffic-schemes-halve-number-of-road-injuries-study-shows

    Posted 2 years ago #
  7. CycleAlex
    Member

    A watered down 'LTN' for Corstorphine with full access to the High Street retained: https://democracy.edinburgh.gov.uk/documents/s36347/Item%207.5%20-%20Corstorphine%20Connections%20LTN.pdf

    No work on the Leith LTN until July'22 but design seems to be the same: https://democracy.edinburgh.gov.uk/documents/s36328/Item%207.4%20-%20Leith%20Connections%20Foot%20of%20the%20Walk%20to%20Ocean%20Terminal.pdf

    Posted 2 years ago #
  8. Wout Van Aerthur Seat
    Member

    A good line in the Leith one

    "UK wide research has also reported that residents very frequently hold strong concerns about traffic levels increasing on certain streets due to LTNs and that LTN type interventions will not lead to traffic evaporation, the theory that reducing roadspace can reduce traffic levels. The research also indicates that these views are often unchanged when presented with the body of academic evidence which supports the theories traffic evaporation). These findings seem to correlate with the consultation results in Leith."

    Basically, the antis have strong cognitive dissonance which allows them to ignore academic research.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  9. chdot
    Admin

    “Basically, the antis have strong cognitive dissonance which allows them to ignore academic research.“

    Sure, but this is where the ‘will of the people’, ‘democracy of consultation’ unnerves politicians - especially months away from an election…

    Cllr Macinnes seems to be holding a line in public, for which she should be admired. Less clear if she will prevail behind closed Party/Coalition doors.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  10. CycleAlex
    Member

    ETRO designs for the Corstorphine LTN. Mostly... meh? I'm sure it improves things but it's not exactly ambitious.

    New speed cushions on QR9 at Dovecot Road and 'traffic calming' on Saughton Road North which mostly consists of painting crossing points red...

    The two physical filters at Carrick Knowe Primary School are also being replaced with part-time signs.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  11. chdot
    Admin

    Improves things for objectors?

    Posted 2 years ago #
  12. Stickman
    Member

    The East Craigs crowd are gearing up to oppose the Corstorphine LTN, despite them not living in the affected area. I imagine Cole-Hamilton is preparing himself to ride to the rescue of the poor oppressed locals.

    Posted 2 years ago #
  13. gembo
    Member

    But the East Craigs People are the Correct People

    Posted 2 years ago #
  14. chdot
    Admin

    “The majority of objections have been from people who use the roads as a shortcut. Most people who live in the area are appreciating the improved quality of life.”

    https://www.yorkpress.co.uk/news/19829604.road-closure-scheme-groves-york-set-become-permanent/

    Posted 2 years ago #
  15. chdot
    Admin

  16. chdot
    Admin

    Owning a car in a city is expensive, especially during an energy crisis, and increasingly impractical, thanks to much-needed environmental measures such as low traffic neighbourhoods. Micromobility offers more personal choice – you can go almost anywhere; more anonymity – no need for number plates or a licence; and, especially if you’re pedalling, feelings of empowerment. In an impatient age, it’s also faster than walking. Where I live in east London, with bikes and scooters cruising past in all directions and barely a moving car in sight, the quieter residential streets feel like a vision of greener city living from the 1970s finally come to life. The future of urban travel seems to have arrived, and it’s small-scale and individualised.

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2022/jun/03/a-bike-a-skateboard-or-the-elizabeth-line-it-depends-where-you-want-society-to-go

    Posted 1 year ago #
  17. chdot
    Admin

    The report, Street Shift: The Future of Low Traffic Neighbourhoods, looked at the roll-out of LTNs by London boroughs in recent years. It found that LTNs reduce car traffic, increase walking and cycling, and make roads safer for all users. But the report argues that LTNs should be introduced alongside complementary measures including promoting cycle training, new public transport options, and a denser network of bike and scooter hire and car clubs.

    https://www.transportxtra.com/publications/parking-review/news/68005/the-workplace-parking-levy-nottingham-pioneers-the-way-ahead/

    Posted 1 year ago #
  18. chdot
    Admin

    The angry drivers insist that LTNs have been imposed on them. Well, whether they agree or not, there are consultations. But no one was consulted about their streets being used as short cuts. No one was consulted about facing a higher risk of asthma and dementia as a result of air pollution, or seeing their communities split by walls of traffic. No one was consulted about losing the places where neighbours could talk and children could play.

    The way we talk about these changes is important. “Low traffic neighbourhood” is a cold, distancing term. I think they would better be named “streets for people”. Instead of announcing “road closures”, councils should herald “street revivals”.

    Public opinion follows a consistent trajectory: once these changes have bedded in, opposition collapses. For instance, in Waltham Forest, 44% of residents objected to their LTN before it was created. But five years on, only 1.7% wanted to see the change reversed. Unfortunately, some councils, such as Lewisham, Harrow and Wandsworth, lost their nerve before their schemes matured, and reversed them after a few difficult weeks. Not Oxford: two weeks ago, the county council voted to make its LTNs permanent.

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2022/aug/03/low-traffic-neighbourhoods-streets-drivers-violence-oxford

    Posted 1 year ago #
  19. chdot
    Admin

    LTN is still happening on time and that a contractor has almost been acquired for Leith and Corstorphine.... and you have until 23 December to comment on the TROs (road closures as part of phase 1/2) - fingers crossed eh.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/leithltn/status/1602609454729543682

    Posted 1 year ago #
  20. steveo
    Member

    Just got the South Corstorphine LTN consultancy leaflet through the door, talk about a lack of ambition on the councils part. Formalising the road closures round the schools and opening (!) the top of Manse Road to two way traffic.

    The have the gall to draw a boundary from St. Johns road to Union park covering most of Carrick Know and Broomhall with absolutely nothing changing and all the existing rat runs in place. Presumably this will allow the council to claim X sq meters of LTN improvements in the next election, budget, pat yourself on the back session.

    Edit: Apologies, just seen the Featherhall place closure, thats something at least, still doesn't exactly justify the huge area "covered" by the ltn with nothing else going on.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  21. chdot
    Admin


    Latest update

    The project is now planned for a first phase of construction to start on 23 January 2023, with planned completion by 24th February 2023. On 24 February the ETRO process is planned to commence and an associated 6-month consultation period will be live; with the trial in place for up to 18 months. Details on how you can provide feedback on the scheme is in the ETRO section below.

    https://www.edinburgh.gov.uk/cycling-walking-projects-1/corstorphine-connections/1

    Posted 1 year ago #
  22. ejstubbs
    Member

    Plan to restrict car journeys in Oxford becomes lightning rod for fears of global assault on freedoms

    Jordan Peterson is rarely lacking in strong opinions, but even by the standards of the Canadian psychologist turned hard-right culture warrior, this was vehement stuff: a city is planning to lock people in their local districts as part of a “well-documented” global plot to, ultimately, deprive them of all personal possessions.

    Where was this? Not Beijing, or even Pyongyang. It was Oxford. In the days since Peterson’s tweet – viewed 7.5m times – officials in the city have fielded endless queries from around the world asking why they are imposing a “climate lockdown”. Inevitably, there have also been some threats.

    Repeated insistence that Peterson’s version of events is nonsense has done little to stem the tide. In the week or so since, large numbers of people, often from the far right or with links to other conspiracy theories, have leapt aboard.

    Oxford’s traffic plan, they insist, is the first step in a global plot led by – depending on who you listen to – the World Economic Forum (WEF) or the UN, designed to strip people of their fundamental rights and personal possessions in the name of the environment.

    (I note that Neil Oliver gets a name check as a GB News contributor. I've heard stories that I probably cannot repeat here about some questionable practices on his TV shows, but I wasn't aware until now that he'd gone full Laurence Fox conspiracy theory nutjob.)

    Posted 1 year ago #
  23. chdot
    Admin

    Yes, I saw some of this when it kicked off.

    Basically an Oxford resident ‘merged’ separate ideas/proposals for LTNs/‘circulation’/15 min neighbourhoods and somehow concluded that people would be FORCED to stay in ‘their own areas’.

    Conveniently ignoring that much of what she said was inaccurate, but also - more to the point - any restrictions would be on vehicles not people!!!

    We live in interesting times.

    As ever, lessons to be learned (unfortunately) are that LAs don’t always get things right, and (perhaps inevitably) underestimate reactions and nonsense.

    See Roseburn…

    Posted 1 year ago #
  24. MediumDave
    Member

    Some complete melt on N*xtD**r[1] is claiming that the Dalry Road 20-minute neighbourhood is part of the evil plan formented by the NWO/WEF/Zionists/EcoFreaks/Woke Snowflakes/The Man/... to restrict everyone to their individual habitation units. Or something. I fear they may have been listening to that Mr Peterson again.

    May have to log on later to correct a few misconceptions.

    Eurgh...

    [1] If one wishes to wallow in the intellectual mire with a bunch of low-grade fash, NextDoor is undoubtedly the best place! There are occasionally pictures of dogs, which mainly makes up for it

    Posted 1 year ago #
  25. MediumDave
    Member

    P.S. this rant is the "top post" smh

    Posted 1 year ago #
  26. ejstubbs
    Member

    I deleted my NextDoor account after encountering one too many* posts expressing bigoted/gammon/reactionary views. All too frequently, a poster would shoehorn their unwelcome opinions into a thread to which the point they had obviously decided it was imperative that they make bore little or no relevance**.

    As part of the deletion process, I was asked to give the reason why I was leaving. I pointed out that, in permitting poisonous nonsense to be infiltrated into otherwise innocuous threads, they were failing to enforce their own rules about keeping discussions friendly.

    * I think it was about the third one (I have a low tolerance for that sort of guff - I find it difficult to take a step back and allow myself to be amused by such ludicrous antics). IIRC the trigger for my departure was when a slightly weird thread, started by a chap trying to trace the person who had driven in to his car and left without exchanging details, got derailed by someone crowbar-ing in a thoroughly unpleasant but all-too-predictably stereotypical anti-cycling rant.

    ** See also EEN below-the-line comments passim: whatever the issue, there always seems to be someone who thinks it's all the council's fault "because of the trams". There should probably be a variant of Godwin's Law about it.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  27. chdot
    Admin

    And this is someone referring to the Porty 20 minute neighbourhood consultation!!

    I will not accept this WEF impingement on my basic human right, freedom of movement. This is a very slippery slope. What next? Fining people if they try to leave their 20min neighbourhood.

    Posted 1 year ago #
  28. chdot
    Admin

    Mostly I hope the fakenews/conspiracy nonsense will go away.

    But…

    Nearly three years on from the start of the pandemic in Britain however, there was a stark reminder of the continuing reach of conspiracy theories on Wednesday when Tory MP Andrew Bridgen lost the party whip after comparing the use of Covid vaccines to the Holocaust. Lewis’s journey away from the beliefs that once enveloped his life meanwhile stands in contrast to others for whom Covid-19 conspiracy theories have acted as a gateway drug to other, more extreme views.


    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2023/jan/11/we-walked-into-a-trap-anti-vaxxers-on-life-after-conspiracy-theories

    Posted 1 year ago #
  29. chdot
    Admin

    Islington Council to introduce low-traffic schemes on 70% of roads

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-64268825

    Posted 1 year ago #
  30. chdot
    Admin

    So why the fuss? One quick answer is that efforts to limit people’s right to drive, whether in previous years through residents’ parking zones, or more recently with low-traffic neighbourhoods, have often prompted a furious response, usually from a noisy minority.

    This is all the more the case when you involve North Americans like Peterson, for whom ideas routine in much of continental Europe such as modal filtering and the “15-minute city” – the latter also popular among conspiracists – are almost unknown.

    Another factor is that efforts to limit urban driving inevitably attract the attention of the large pool of climate conspirators who, in a significant Venn diagram crossover with vaccine conspirators, often believe in the idea of a “great reset” plot led by multinational organisations.

    https://www.theguardian.com/environment/bike-blog/2023/jan/10/why-do-traffic-reduction-schemes-attract-so-many-conspiracy-theories

    Posted 1 year ago #

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