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"Growing Up in Scotland: Overweight, obesity and activity

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  1. chdot
    Admin

    “Anyone know how to link to YouTube without it automatically embedding?”

    Embedding fine, but look for their shortlink if you need one.

    Posted 9 months ago #
  2. gembo
    Member

    Good old Len

    Jazz police are paid by J Paul Getty
    Jazzers paid by J Paul Getty too

    Also from I'm Your Man, his best album and one f my faves

    They sentenced me to twenty years of boredom
    For trying to change the system from within
    I'm coming now I'm coming to reward them
    First we take Manhattan, then we take Berlin

    And of course

    I said to Hank Williams, How lonely does it get
    Hank Williams hasn't answered yet
    But I hear him coughing all night long
    A hundred floors above me in the Tower of Song

    And

    Well you can stick your little Pins in your voodoo doll
    I'm very sorry baby doesn't look like me at all
    ....they don't let a woman kill you
    Not in the tower of song

    Can't quite recall the kill you line so will listen now

    To me he is Il miglior fabbro

    But to him il miglior fabbro is Hank

    Billy Connolly loved Bert Jansch and there is a great BBC programme where he goes with Bert to visit Sonny Terry, who is Bert's hero. Sonny Terry of the great duo as mentioned in Van Morrison's Cleaning Windows

    Sonny Terry, Brownie McGhee, Muddy Waters sings I'm a rollin stone.

    Sonny and brownie hated each other at the end like Walter Matthau and George burns in Neil Simon's The Sunshine Boys.

    Posted 9 months ago #
  3. chdot
    Admin

  4. chdot
    Admin

  5. chdot
    Admin

    Just a reminder, this thread started with

    http://www.gov.scot/Publications/2012/05/5385/0

    FIVE YEARS AGO.

    Nothing much seems to have changed.

    Posted 8 months ago #
  6. Nelly
    Member

    A quarter of 5 year olds?

    And their only soundbites appear to be "stop BOGOF offers on chocolate and fizzy drinks" and "force restaurants to serve smaller portions".

    i.e. same legislation / sledgehammer approach as on alcohol.

    Nothing said about exercise, nothing said about educating the parents (many of whom see fat as the new normal) about healthy food intake for their kids.

    Think I will invest my pension in mobility scooters..........

    Posted 8 months ago #
  7. chdot
    Admin

    One of the country’s most senior nurses has said patients should say something to health workers if they think they are overweight.

    Chief nursing officer Fiona McQueen was responsible for drawing up policy on how best to tackle the growing problem of obesity in the UK.

    As the same time, she says she was ‘clearly losing my own battle with the bulge’.

    http://metro.co.uk/2018/01/18/call-nurse-fat-think-overweight-7238991/

    Posted 7 months ago #
  8. crowriver
    Member

    @TheEconomist
    If current trends continue, obese children will soon outnumber those who are undernourished

    https://twitter.com/TheEconomist/status/956293366047703040

    (Globally, not just UK/West).

    Posted 6 months ago #
  9. chdot
    Admin

    Public health officials said they were working with industry to make food healthier.

    They also said a sugar reduction programme and the government's sugar tax would help to tackle childhood obesity.

    The researchers, from the University of Birmingham, said families, communities and the food industry probably had more of an influence than school initiatives.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-42976971

    Posted 6 months ago #
  10. neddie
    Member

    Being fat as an adult is linked to 13 different types of cancer, says Cancer Research UK, who did the analysis.

    The list includes breast, bowel and kidney cancer, but only 15% of people in the UK are aware of the link, according to the charity.

    Britain is the most obese nation in Western Europe, with rates rising faster than in any other developed nation.

    http://www.bbc.com/news/health-43195977

    Posted 5 months ago #
  11. chdot
    Admin

    He encouraged me to get active - at 22 and a half stone I was morbidly obese and chronically unfit

    https://www.gallowaygazette.co.uk/news/health/newton-stewart-man-cycles-the-length-of-scotland-in-memory-of-his-late-wife-1-4497856

    Posted 5 months ago #
  12. chdot
    Admin

    Glasgow Games had little impact on sport participation, report says

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-43620479

    Of course there’s more to it than ‘sport’, clearly Govs need to think #ActiveTravel!

    http://www.heraldscotland.com/sport/16127046.Aileen_Campbell_MSP__There_has_been_a_tangible_legacy_to_Glasgow_hosting_the_Games/

    Posted 4 months ago #
  13. I were right about that saddle
    Member

  14. I were right about that saddle
    Member

    Whodathunkit? Volume 346.

    Posted 3 months ago #
  15. neddie
    Member

    Individual teachers can decide when to fit the Daily Mile into the school day...

    There's your problem, right there.

    No mention of how to automatically build it into daily life i.e. by walking to school, to/from the shops etc.

    Posted 3 months ago #
  16. Calum
    Member

    There's your problem, right there.

    Yup. I almost became a teacher, I did the postgrad course. The Daily Mile was a Thing that year but frankly it was bottom priority. In practice nobody even delivers the full recommended PE time, never mind anything extra. Active travel is the way to go.

    Posted 3 months ago #
  17. sallyhinch
    Member

    Yes, active travel in everyday life is the way to go - but we're facing a bit of a health emergency now, and at least the daily mile has the potential to reach every child, not just the ones whose parents have the time/patience/nice neighbourhoods to walk and cycle with their offspring to school.

    Posted 3 months ago #
  18. chdot
    Admin

    “When I was young, to play outside was really normal. We wouldn’t think about it. Today kids are playing more with their mobile phones or sitting behind their computers. Because of this, more kids are suffering from obesity and the solution should be very simple. We have to teach children how to move more at school. With just a few alterations we could create for Dutch schoolyards more opportunities for children to play outside together. This can only happen if we do it together.”

    https://www.theguardian.com/football/2018/may/12/johan-cruyff-leftwing-legacy-amsterdam-rich-barred-renting-childhood-home

    Posted 3 months ago #
  19. chdot
    Admin

  20. chdot
    Admin

  21. crowriver
    Member

    Study casts doubt on 'healthy obesity'

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-44301684

    Handy weight and waist size comparator tool at the foot of the page too.

    Apparently "About 75% of men in your age group in Scotland are overweight, obese or very obese." (45-54 age group). I'm no longer any of these (except a similar age), thankfully...

    Posted 2 months ago #
  22. acsimpson
    Member

    "overweight or obese but otherwise healthy"

    That sounds a bit too much like OLA motorists.

    Posted 2 months ago #
  23. chdot
    Admin

    Researchers studying this “social gradient in overweight” across different countries see a pattern emerging. Obesity is a form of malnutrition, they argue, and the greater the structural inequality within a society, the more that people living under financial and social constraints lack the opportunities for an active, healthy life.

    https://www.theguardian.com/society/2018/jun/03/obesity-food-poverty-cheap-bread

    Posted 2 months ago #
  24. chdot
    Admin

    Channel 4 bosses have said Jamie Oliver’s campaign for a ban on airing junk food adverts before 9pm is wrong, arguing that it is anachronistic because children rarely watch live television.

    The celebrity chef, who is one of Channel 4’s biggest stars, recently launched a campaign backed by Jeremy Corbyn and Nicola Sturgeon for a ban on TV advertising for food high in salt, fat or sugar before the watershed, arguing that such products are a cause of childhood obesity.

    However, Channel 4 said any such ban could have a substantial impact on its revenue and prevent it from funding programmes about healthy living.

    https://www.theguardian.com/media/2018/jun/05/junk-food-ad-ban-could-cost-tv-industry-200m-says-channel-4

    Posted 2 months ago #
  25. chdot
    Admin

    The scientist, whose speciality is understanding the mechanisms that lead to diabetes, said it was “simplistic” to label the problem as solely due to obesity but added that the biggest risk factor for type 2 diabetes was body mass, accounting for almost 90 per cent of cases.

    https://www.scotsman.com/news/uk/diabetes-expert-urges-national-strategy-to-prevent-disease-1-4768929

    Posted 1 month ago #
  26. chdot
    Admin

    Psychologist Emma Kenny has been advising Food Standards Scotland on their new obesity campaign against upsizing

    http://www.heraldscotland.com/news/16383152.junk-food-and-red-meat-should-be-sold-with-graphic-health-warnings-says-expert/

    Posted 2 weeks ago #
  27. chdot
    Admin

  28. Nelly
    Member

    Excellent article in the Herald. Problem as always is translating well meaning hand wringing into reality.

    The fast food proliferation is awful, and for some people these are what represents "a restaurant".

    Its very noticeable if you happen to be at a shopping centre / retail park which, again, is what some people call "the shops" ;

    Cameron Toll - Subway, Greggs, Costa, McDonalds

    Straiton - KFC, Subway, McDonalds, Frankie and Bennys

    The Fort - McDonalds, KFC, Subway, Greggs, Pizza Hut, and god knows what else in the new bit at the cinema.

    While its not a popular opinion, fat is fast becoming a class issue where poor(er) less socially mobile families see nothing out of the ordinary about the above.

    Posted 4 days ago #
  29. chdot
    Admin

    “While its not a popular opinion”

    Neither popular in the sense of people understanding (or even thinking about) the issues, nor - what I think you mean - are some people who know about some of this willing to be seen as moralistic or classist.

    Just a general symptom of ‘lack of leadership’ - fear of accusations of ‘nanny statism’.

    (And that’s not even thinking about commercial interests...)

    Posted 4 days ago #
  30. Nelly
    Member

    @chdot - yes, exactly.

    There was a part of that Herald article regarding Jamie Oliver and Sturgeon chatting about taxing high fat foods - the immediate response in some quarters was "snobby english guy telling us what to do" rather than "this food is killing you".

    Posted 4 days ago #

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